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Bye Bye Dolly, Hello Ipad!

Kindle-FireAccording to a new survey conducted by The Intelligence Group on 800 children, two thirds of children between the ages of 7 and 13 would prefer a tech gadget to a toy.  Bye Bye Dolly, Hello Ipad!

The survey was being conducted to better understand the behaviours of children and how they interact.

Children have become more digitally orientated, with 28% percent of children owning a tablet – believe it or not but this figure has actually increased by a whopping 23% in two years!  According to the survey, a third of the children surveyed own a mobile phone, and over 35% of those use texting as their main form of communication.  Email also proved popular with 19% of the children using email to communicate.

Scarily, 23% of children preferred to use social media such as Facebook and Skype to communicate.

Social media isn’t the only big hitter for children surfing the web. Youtube proved to be popular with over 53% of little surfers visiting the video sharing website. unsurprisingly, Disney’s website was also popular with 31%.

With so much technology at little fingertips, it seems that children prefer tech gadgets to toys nowadays.

‘As society’s first true “digital natives,” they feel empowered by their access to information and seek to influence the products and content they consume,’ the report continues.

Senior director of strategic innovation at The Intelligence Group, Allison Arling-Giorgi said brands should be aware of the findings, as children aged seven to thirteen make up the bulk of the consumer segment and are the main drivers behind parental purchases.

Are your children more interested in gadgets than toys? Is it really Bye Bye Dolly, Hello Ipad?

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